Tee Transporter Bridge.

Similar to the Newport Transporter Bridge in Wales which I have visited in the past today we crossed in the campervan  the River Tee’s at Middlesbrough on the Tee’s Transporter Bridge.

tb1

Built in 1911 to transport worker rcross the river. In 2011  The heritage Lottery Fund confirmed a £2.6m award to support the refurbishment of the bridge.

 

With a span of 851 feet this iconic structure is the longest working transporter bridge in the world. It is a landmark on Teesside.

TB2.jpg

On River Training under the Transporter bridgerivertraining

 

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Heading North{again}

Off to North Yorkshire stopping at the Humber Bridge for breakfast, a walk around (& the loo) on  the way up. In the past we have stopped at the viewing points on the Hull (North) side of the bridge. This time stopped on the South side much quieter no coaches or kiss me quick hats. Just quiet car park an old ship repair yard and creek.humber bridgeoff the railsup the creek.jpgboat yardboat yard1

A Drive into Wales

Saturday we set off for a few nights in a cottage in South Wales close to the Glamorgan Coast.

views around Brecon

views around Brecon the large bales are of Bracken use for winter feed,

Having crossed into Wales we followed the A40 to Brecon to make a day out before heading south to our holiday cottage. We stopped at Trellech a small village {just South of Monmouth}. This interesting village has a old castle mound but we stopped to visit a holy well, the sign at the well reads “The Virtuous Well once known as St Ann’s well and famous for it’s cures, it was visited by many Pilgrim’s as late as the 17th century. It is said to be 4 separate springs, 3 containing iron and each curing a different illness. It’s niches held offerings and cups. Stone seats gave rest to the weary traveller.” A half a mile further on from the well are three standing stones known locally as Harold’s Stones or The three stones. The large stones are also worth seeing.

well2well3well1well

A Paddle Steam along the coast.

THE PS Waverley

THE PS Waverley

Yesterday we took trip on the PS Waverley the last sea going paddle steamer. Our trip started at 106 berth Southampton sailing at 10.00hrs then down Southampton Water into Portsmouth harbour. We then headed for Yarmouth on the Isle of Wight. Later   on to the Needles and around the point into choppier seas before heading back. The Waverley was built on the Clyde in 1947 to replace the original Waverley that was lost off Dunkirk in 1940. This blog shows pictures of the paddle steamer my next blogs will show the pictures of the trip.

Along side Southampton

Along side Southampton

Another view

Another view

Crew member at work

Crew member at work

At Sea

At Sea

lounge

lounge

engines

engines

funnels

funnels

Let it rain, let it rain, let it rain

Rain at St Andrews Beach

Rain at St Andrews Beach

It started raining hard early Friday evening and continued all night. It was still pouring when we left the campsite. Stopping at St Andrews beach it continued to pour down.

We decided to follow the coast and return to our campsite by then going inland doing a large circular day out. The coastal villages reminded us of Yorkshire seaside villages around Staiths. The building styles and use of and the style of red roof tiles.

Villages on the coast

Villages on the coast

We also went to Scotland’s secret bunker. A 100ft below ground level under a ordinary farmhouse was build a 24,000 square feet Government command centre to be used following a nuclear attack. Only decommissioned in 1992..

Scotland's Secret Bunker

Scotland’s Secret Bunker

On leaving the bunker the weather was drying up. Heading for a close look at the Forth rail bridge and the construction of the new road crossing. Before heading back we sneaked a quick look of Britain’s new aircraft carrier under construction at Rosyth.

4th rail bridge

more off shore operations

more off shore operations

Sea Gull

Sea Gull

new road crossing under construction

new road crossing under construction

new Aircraft Carrier under construction

new Aircraft Carrier under construction

Down by the river

cobdon area soton 007acobdon area soton 019cobdon area soton 022acobdon area soton 023Often we overlook places we pass daily these photo’s record  part of the River Itchen at St Denys Southampton. There has been a bridge over the Itchen here since 1883. a mile or so further up the river is the end of the tidal part of the riverCobden BridgeThe current concrete bridge was built between 1926 and 1928 (opened in 1928 by the then Minister of Transport Wilfred Ashley.) While crossing the bridge some small tug boats were taking a sludge barge up to the local sewage works glad it was on the way up rather than coming back ! Each side of the bridge are a number of WW2 torpedo boats converted into houseboats.