Art formed from decay.

There are remains a large rotting timber rail pier at the Port of Blyth I guess it will slowly rot away but today the structure is an art form of the towns past.

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Tee Transporter Bridge.

Similar to the Newport Transporter Bridge in Wales which I have visited in the past today we crossed in the campervan  the River Tee’s at Middlesbrough on the Tee’s Transporter Bridge.

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Built in 1911 to transport worker rcross the river. In 2011  The heritage Lottery Fund confirmed a £2.6m award to support the refurbishment of the bridge.

 

With a span of 851 feet this iconic structure is the longest working transporter bridge in the world. It is a landmark on Teesside.

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On River Training under the Transporter bridgerivertraining

 

Heading North{again}

Off to North Yorkshire stopping at the Humber Bridge for breakfast, a walk around (& the loo) on  the way up. In the past we have stopped at the viewing points on the Hull (North) side of the bridge. This time stopped on the South side much quieter no coaches or kiss me quick hats. Just quiet car park an old ship repair yard and creek.humber bridgeoff the railsup the creek.jpgboat yardboat yard1

Memories of a summers day in Shoreham 2015

Close to Shoreham Airport is an old wooden toll bridge which has become a temporary memorial to the 11 people kill on the ground when an ex RAF Vintage Hawker Hunter T7, jet crashed onto the A27. Ribbons now replaced original flower which were left on the bridge following the crash on 22nd August 2015 during this years airshow. Visiting today a steady flow of people crossed the bridge to look at the memorial.

Shoreham Toll Bridge

Shoreham Toll Bridge

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The oldest iron suspension bridge in Europe

After a long drive yesterday I declare Sunday a day of rest so plan to potter around not too far from the cottage. From the cottage the dead end lane hits the sea looking out to Holy Island with the Castle directly opposite. The lane gave an opportunity to undertake my favourite past time of collecting wild blackberries. Abundant in wildlife swallows buzz up and down the lane stocking up with insects before the journey back to Africa. Sparrows and Yellow hammers sit on the hedge tops. At the bottom of the lane is a bird hide but only Curlew’s present due to the state of the tide (will return later at a different time). The sun has also encouraged more Butterflies than I have seen for a while. The weather is an improvement today clear blue sky’s.

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A short drive into Berwick -Upon-Tweed to fill up with fuel and up river to visit to The Union Chain Bridge the oldest surviving iron suspension bridge in Europe. This vehicle bridge was built by Captain (later Sir) Samuel Brown RN between 1819-20. He pioneered the iron anchor chains and registered patents of his work. The Union Chain Bridge cost £7,700 to build and opened on 26th July 1820. Brown showed off this bridges strength by driving over it with 12 loaded carts which were followed by 600 spectators an estimated weight of some 20 tons. The bridge replaced the often flooded river ford, it was also quicker (took less than a year) and was cheaper to build than conventional stone bridge. although cars can still cross the Tweed here our camper exceeds the weight limit so it was a park and walk across into Scotland.

By the sea at Berwick

By the sea at Berwick

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a chain bridge

The Union Chain Bridge

The Union Chain Bridge

Some further Photo’s of The Forth Rail Bridge, I like this bridge

The Forth Bridge was a major engineering achievements of Victorian times .Designed by Sir John Fowler and Benjamin Baker, the bridge was based on the cantilever principle, with three diamond shaped steel towers 104 metres high carrying a double railway line 46 metres above the River Forth.

The bridge took seven years to build, and contractors used 55,000 tons of steel, 194,000 tons of stone and concrete, and 7.5 million rivets to complete what is a world known landmark. Opened 4th March 1880.

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Let it rain, let it rain, let it rain

Rain at St Andrews Beach

Rain at St Andrews Beach

It started raining hard early Friday evening and continued all night. It was still pouring when we left the campsite. Stopping at St Andrews beach it continued to pour down.

We decided to follow the coast and return to our campsite by then going inland doing a large circular day out. The coastal villages reminded us of Yorkshire seaside villages around Staiths. The building styles and use of and the style of red roof tiles.

Villages on the coast

Villages on the coast

We also went to Scotland’s secret bunker. A 100ft below ground level under a ordinary farmhouse was build a 24,000 square feet Government command centre to be used following a nuclear attack. Only decommissioned in 1992..

Scotland's Secret Bunker

Scotland’s Secret Bunker

On leaving the bunker the weather was drying up. Heading for a close look at the Forth rail bridge and the construction of the new road crossing. Before heading back we sneaked a quick look of Britain’s new aircraft carrier under construction at Rosyth.

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more off shore operations

more off shore operations

Sea Gull

Sea Gull

new road crossing under construction

new road crossing under construction

new Aircraft Carrier under construction

new Aircraft Carrier under construction