SS Shieldhall, A trip on Southampton Water


SS Shieldhall

SS Shieldhall

The SS Shieldhall is an unique example of a working of steamship, typical of the cargo and passenger ships that crossed the oceans of the world from the 1870s until the mid 1960s The Shieldhall was built in the 1950’s built on the classical lines of a 1920s steamer with a traditional wheelhouse; the hull is of riveted and welded construction and this unusual feature is representative of the transitional phase in British shipbuilding when welding took over from riveted build. The hull has a slightly raked bow and cruiser stern. The decks are of teak An emergency steering position at the rear add to the classic type of ship layout. Her lines reminds me of ships you see in convoys of WW2.

SS Shieldhall Wheelhouse

Today Shieldhall is thought to be the largest working steam ship in Northern Europe. Originally built to carry treated sewage sludge down the Clyde which it dumped at sea. Today she is run as a historic steam ship and takes passengers on day trips from Southampton docks.

Although I have visited the Shieldhall in the past today’s trip was the first time I have been to sea on her. (down Southampton Water to Netley and back). The weather being good added to this pleasant trip on the water. The Shieldhall only had about 70 passengers on board but can take 200 so there was plenty of space to enjoy the trip including visits to the engine room, boiler room and wheelhouse.

Engine Room

Engine Room

Boiler Room. Oil is preheated prior to being fed into the boilers

Boiler Room. Oil is preheated prior to being fed into the boilers

full steam ahead

full steam ahead

funnel

ahead

flag

flag

Tonnage 1792 GT

Support the Lifeboats

Support the Lifeboats

Length     268ft

Beam     44ft 6in

Draught   10ft6in

Launched July 1954

all at seaQueen

River Police

River Police

Under tow

Under tow

under sail

under sail

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6 thoughts on “SS Shieldhall, A trip on Southampton Water

  1. I do like a nice triple expansion engine 🙂

    Was at a conference in San Francisco many years ago and was quite upset to have just missed the opportunity to go for a ride on the Jeremiah O’Brian (I think I’ve remembered that right), the last working Liberty ship. The Engine room was used during the filming of Titanic. Having only seen them on the seabed it was nice to take a stroll around a floating example, anyway.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What was nice they were happy for you to visit the engine room during the trip, although most passengers did not venture bellow the water line. Very hot and very intresting best bit of the trip.

    Like

  3. Pingback: SS Shieldhall. – REFLECTIONS FROM MY WORLD A Pictorial Snap shot.

  4. Pingback: Steam up. | REFLECTIONS FROM MY WORLD

  5. This was interesting Andy. I am a legal secretary and one of our longstanding clients is a shipping company who has a fleet of freighters. At one time they had a fleet of small and large freighters and tug barges, but they no longer have one of their large customers, so the larger freighters are in dry dock and have been for some time. My boss goes on an annual freighter trip on the S.S. Alpena with a lawyer friend of his. I was sure I had a better picture of one of his trips on this freighter, as he usually e-mails me a photo from each trip. This is a post I did way back in 2013 about his trip. I was amazed when I was on the JAW Iglehart, which also took paying passengers who wanted a freighter trip on the Great Lakes, just how luxurious parts of the freighter was. I also got to see the Engine Room and Galley and meet the crew when we went over there for lunch – it was a fun afternoon. https://lindaschaubblog.net/2013/09/27/if-the-wind-is-right-you-can-sail-away-and-find-tranquility/

    Liked by 1 person

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